quick question, maybe suggestion

Discussion in 'CloneDVD' started by lostinlodos, Mar 7, 2007.

  1. lostinlodos

    lostinlodos Well-Known Member

    Is there any way to force CloneDVD to ignore, in essence bypass, read errors/crc errors, et cetera. It would be nice, especially on rare, hard to find discs, to watch the movie and have a few short gaps/shifts in the movie than not be able to watch it at all. Am I alone on this?
     
  2. mmdavis

    mmdavis Well-Known Member

  3. Whisperer

    Whisperer Well-Known Member

    lostinlodos,
    My assumption is that mmdavis has given you a well intentioned answer but he may have misinterpreted your question.

    You are asking about having trouble copying scratched or flawed originals correct? And CloneDVD gives you a read error correct? I want to be sure I am interpreting your question correctly so if you post back that this is your problem, then I will post you information.

    Whisperer
     
  4. Webslinger

    Webslinger Retired Moderator

    I would rather have a perfect backup than have to deal with "gaps" as a result of what would amount to a brute force rip. (That is, go exchange your original for a good working disc.)
     
  5. lostinlodos

    lostinlodos Well-Known Member

    Exactly. I already know why it has issues. There are scratches, dents, even dings or holes. I was looking for a way to not have to hear a doing and press a button every time an error came up, it's really repetitive. I refuse to click cancel. Doing it by hand achieves the desired result in the end, a mostly watchable video, but it would be nice to not have to sit there for hours on end doing it manually.
     
  6. Webslinger

    Webslinger Retired Moderator

    Can I borrow your disc? I have this old drive I've been trying to kill for 6 months, but it just won't die. ;)
     
    Last edited: Mar 8, 2007
  7. Webslinger

    Webslinger Retired Moderator

    Clonedvd automatically tries a number of read retries, but it your case . . . just get a better original. The answer to your question is no.
     
  8. Whisperer

    Whisperer Well-Known Member

    In your situation, no software can read that severely damaged of a disk. You can click "retry" until we win the war in Iraq but your laser still won't be able to read the data layer on your original. Since you said it is rare, and if you can't get another original, then there is only one solution. You are going to have to resurface your original disk's surface. It's really pretty easy with the right tool and the right technique.

    Do some studying:
    http://club.cdfreaks.com/showpost.php?p=1284334&postcount=36

    http://club.cdfreaks.com/showpost.php?p=1164934&postcount=2

    http://club.cdfreaks.com/showpost.php?p=1657367&postcount=10

    http://digitalinnovations.com/products.php?id=36&checkCat=5

    So get to it!:doh: :D

    Whisperer
     
    Last edited: Mar 8, 2007
  9. lostinlodos

    lostinlodos Well-Known Member

    Sure!

    Thanks everyone;:clap:
    I think my next step is to build a macro that will click for me. :doh:
     
  10. DrinkLyeAndDie

    DrinkLyeAndDie Retired Moderator

    I really loath even doing this but...

    You could try using AnyDVD & DVD Decrypter. Once I couldn't make a backup of Ocean's 12 that had been very poorly handled by a friend. I've since punished them severely for ruining my disc. Imagine Hostel...

    Anyway, CloneDVD2 simply couldn't get through the disc w/o failing and it didn't matter how many times I clicked and kept it trying... it wouldn't complete. With DVD Decrypter the disc was able to be copied to my HDD but I lost the are where the damage was on the disc [which actually was about a 5 second gap if even out of the entire movie]. I then burned it to disc with CloneDVD2 and it plays beautifully [while skipping that 5 second dead spot].

    I hate recommending a different program in a support forum but try it out and see if it helps resolve backing up this damaged disc.
     
  11. Webslinger

    Webslinger Retired Moderator

    Yeah, what you likely did in essence is a brute force rip. This can, over time, wear out one's reader more quickly.
     
    Last edited: Mar 8, 2007
  12. DrinkLyeAndDie

    DrinkLyeAndDie Retired Moderator

    I wouldn't do this on a regular basis nor recommend it often. There's very little excuse for DVDs to get this damaged except in cases of... accidents [this includes exposure to children ;)] or idiocy [this includes exposure to irresponsible adults and/or drunk people] which shouldn't be common!

    DVD Decrypter tried the problem area a certain amt of times and then skipped it and moved on. At the time I had no alternative and I really didn't wish to pay for a new copy [because the movie wasn't worth it].
     
    Last edited: Mar 8, 2007
  13. lostinlodos

    lostinlodos Well-Known Member

    keep on keepin on

    DrinkLyeAndDie: That's my final-choice method now. I guess originally as I posted that was what I was looking for in CloneDVD. A brute-force method. I buy my DVDs used from rental shops in Japan and China mostly. Many are totally trashed but CloneDVD tends to make it through most.
    The most damaged ones though I have to use your method with that old pos program and AnyDVD. I do burn out my drives quite a bit though. Luckily I review equipment for a monthly magazine and get new drives for free every few months for reviews. Just was hoping I could find a way to do it with CloneDVD and not DeCrapper.
    Maybe when SlySoft gets bored they could work in a brute-force option down the line.
     
  14. Webslinger

    Webslinger Retired Moderator

    Keep in mind Elby is the official developer of Clonedvd--and not Slysoft (although Slysoft does, no doubt, have some input).