Question about future of AnyDVD HD

Discussion in 'AnyDVD HD (Blu-ray issues)' started by Ealaia, May 1, 2007.

  1. Ealaia

    Ealaia Member

    Hello,
    unfortunately, www.anydvd.com FAQ doesn't cover the HD version, I hope Skysoft employee can answer..

    As far as I understand, unlike SD-DVD, no-one has cracked HD-DVD or BD-DVD's copy protection. So, unless Slysoft has a network of supercomputers that are deriving the player keys through brute force, they must be using pirated keys... That's OK with me... This is my assumption.
    My question: if my assumption is correct, will we come to a point where AnyDVD HD will not work and hence become useless?

    Thanks, Ai
     
  2. mmdavis

    mmdavis Well-Known Member

    This comes off the AnyDVD HD section on Slysoft.com:

    AnyDVD HD comes with same functionality as AnyDVD, but with additional features for full HD-DVD (High Definition DVD) and Blu-Ray support, including decryption of HD-DVD & Blu-Ray movie discs.

    Allows you to watch movies over a digital display connection, without HDCP compliant graphics card and HDCP compliant display. No need to buy an expensive monitor. Sweet!

    Playback your discs on your PC with PowerDVD Ultra, which otherwise do not run (titles released by Studio Canal, The Weinstein Company, Kinowelt, Optimum Releasing).

    AnyDVD HD is the "must have" utility for the serious home theater enthusiast using a media center / home theater PC.

    Another amazing feature of AnyDVD HD is "magic file replacement ™". Remaster any commercial movie disc using simple XML scripts. These scripts will "magically" replace the files on the physical disc. You can customize discs as you like without even making a copy to harddisk!

    AnyDVD comes with a UDF 2.5 file ripper, no need to install 3rd party UDF 2.5 filesystem under Windows XP.
    Features HD-DVD

    * Same features as regular AnyDVD
    * Removes encryption (AACS) from HD-DVDs
    * watch movies over digital display connection, without HDCP compliant graphics card and HDCP compliant display.
    * playback of discs on the PC with PowerDVD Ultra, which otherwise do not run.
    * Removes user prohibitions, you can select the language and subtitle track without going through the disc's menu.
    * Removes parental restrictions.
    * Allows you to remove or skip Studio Logos and warning messages.
    * With "magic file replacement ™" you can remaster any commercial movie disc using simple XML scripts.
    * The "must have" utility for the serious home theater enthusiast using a media center / home theater PC.
    * Includes a UDF 2.5 file ripper, no need to install 3rd party UDF 2.5 filesystem under Windows XP.

    Features Blu-Ray

    * Same features as regular AnyDVD
    * Removes encryption (AACS) from Blu-Ray DVDs
    * Removes region codes from Blu-Ray DVDs
    * watch movies over digital display connection, without HDCP compliant graphics card and HDCP compliant display.
    * The "must have" utility for the serious home theater enthusiast using a media center / home theater PC.
    * Includes a UDF 2.5 file ripper, no need to install 3rd party UDF 2.5 filesystem under Windows XP.
     
    Last edited: May 1, 2007
  3. Ealaia

    Ealaia Member

    Thanks mmdavis, but which part of that regurgitation answers my question? Ai
     
    Last edited: May 1, 2007
  4. Webslinger

    Webslinger Retired Moderator

    Last edited: May 1, 2007
  5. Ealaia

    Ealaia Member

  6. deaacs

    deaacs Well-Known Member

    You've been watching too many movies - was CSS cracked using "pirated keys"? No. Was it cracked using a network of supercomputers? No. People create encryption, therefore people break encryption.

    To give you a basic example of encryption - there is standard "cipher" code; which would replace every letter in the alphabet with a seemingly arbitrary choice. So for instance, you may use the letter A to represent the letter Q the letter B to represent the letter S, and so forth.

    This was once thought to be a strong form of encryption, but it was worked out that you could crack it by recognizing letter frequency, or even word frequency. For instance, "E" is the most used letter in the English language, therefore whatever letter (or symbol) is used most is most likely used to represent the letter "E". Over 50% of all English words end in either E, T, D or S. So there were many ways to determine what letters had been used.

    Now supposing that a stronger encryption is used, it's still conceivable that one could use word-frequency to help deduct the code. For instance "the" is the most used English word, so if you could recognize the sequence of code that represented "the" you'd be on your way to deciphering the code.

    Some encryptions use keys that are unique for every use. For instance, you and only you may know your code; and using the same encryption algorithm I have my own code, but I cannot decrypt your files and you can't decrypt mine. However DVD, HD-DVD and Bluray Disc work on the fact that your DVD player can decrypt both your DVD and my DVD; so don't have "private keys" (so to speak).

    Now let's suppose you were to run your HD-DVD within a virtual console, and at the moment it plays you take a capture of the (virtual) system RAM. You'd be able to work your way through and isolate the section used by the decrypter, and you'd be able to see how the code looked beforehand by looking at the physical bits of data on the HD-DVD.

    Anyway, if you were to brute-force your way through 8-bit (1 byte) encryption, it would mean you've got 256 possible keys (because there are 256 combinations of 8bits, which we know as characters). With DVD the number of possible keys for CSS was 1,099,511,627,776, and even that takes a while through brute-force. The number of possible keys for a 128-bit encryption is, oh... 340,282,366,920,938,463,463,374,607,431,768,211,456 possibilities. I can't imagine brute-forcing that in a hurry, even with a network of super computers (or with a universe filled with monkeys in front of typewriters either).
     
  7. Charlie

    Charlie Well-Known Member

    If you did a search you would see the answer you seek but to put all those posts in plain and simple terms it doesn't use those pirated keys, it has it's own legal way of getting the job done. :D
     
  8. sheep

    sheep Well-Known Member

    A very good explanation.:clap: