AACS is dead on a disc level, not on a hardware level.

Discussion in 'AnyDVD HD (Blu-ray issues)' started by gameowl, Apr 21, 2017.

  1. gameowl

    gameowl Well-Known Member

    I just put in a backup bluray movie I just copied with AnyDVD HD and CloneBD of Captain America: Winter Solider (the movie doesn't matter), in my PC"s bluray drive. And started PowerDVD 14 Ultra to play it Soon as PowerDVD 14 Ultra starts up. It asks me to update the AACS license key or movies might not play it said. You have the option to select YES or NO. ALWAYS SELECT NO. This is the AACS software version for computers of key revocation. When you rip a bluray with AnyDVD HD, it removes all the AACS encryption including the Media Key Block version encryption key. So if you update your computers lessened bluray software player when it asks. It will update the code that will check your bluray discs, MKB (media key block) on the bluray movie disc to make sure it's not a backup movie that it's authentic. If it doesn't detect the MKB it will revoke any AnyDVD HD backed up bluray and won't play it. Set top bluray players do this differently. They do it by reading the MKB file of the bluray discs and storing it in the bluray players hardware chip one tiny line of code that will check for a bluray movies disc MKB to make sure it's authentic. If it's not, it won't release the processing key to play the movie. Fortunately, the bluray MKB revocation isn't in every movie disc so it's the odds of putting what disc in revokes what. And if you only put copied AnyDVD HD with CloneBD movies in, it can't revoke through the disc since there is now AACS MKB encryption key on it, to update the player. I've been implementing encryption on my computers now for 15 years. I wouldn't lie or make this up. AACS-LA got smarter from DVD's DeCSS, and designed AACS DRM to defeat ripping like AnyDVD HD. AACS is like Zombie-DRM you kill it, it comes back.
     
  2. Adbear

    Adbear Well-Known Member

    I've been backing up Blu-rays since the very first release (Ice age the Meltdown Jan 2007) and have always allowed PDVD to update its' key. It has never once blocked my backups. That would make no sense as the back ups no longer have any AACS encryption so PDVD has no way to tell if the disc you are playing is a back up or one you have authored yourself
     
  3. gameowl

    gameowl Well-Known Member

    if the backups don't have a MKB encryption key, the set top players and licensed bluray playing software, will see it not on the disc. And won't release the processing key in the player/software to play the disc.
     
  4. Adbear

    Adbear Well-Known Member

    If the backups have no AACS encryption then they don't need the key. That's the whole point of using AnyDVD, and if you make an encrypted ISO then they just won't play anyway without AnyDVD running in the background to remove the encryption on the fly