#1 reason to use ISOs instead of playing HD DVDs from the hard drive

Discussion in 'AnyDVD HD (Blu-ray issues)' started by roog, Apr 4, 2008.

  1. roog

    roog Well-Known Member

    IMHO, the #1 reason to use ISOs instead of playing non-ISO rips from the hard drive is that, if you want to play HD DVD movies from another computer on your network, you no longer have to map the hard drive locally in order to get the HD DVDs to play with PowerDVD Ultra 7.

    I also agree with others that, after inserting the disc while AnyDVD HD is enabled, you should exit AnyDVD HD and then create the ISO so that you get the full disc without modifications. Then if an error is found in AnyDVD HD, and fixed in a subsequent release, you can re-rip the ISO because it's just like the original disc.
     
  2. SamuriHL

    SamuriHL Retired Moderator

    Yea! What he said!! :D :agree: Couldn't agree more. Uh, wait, except that last sentence. You won't HAVE to re-rip if there's an AnyDVD problem. Just upgrade AnyDVD and you're done. :)
     
  3. gwolfman

    gwolfman Well-Known Member

    Do you recommend ripping with AnyDVD HD disabled then?
     
  4. roog

    roog Well-Known Member

    Yes, it makes more sense in the long run.
     
  5. SamuriHL

    SamuriHL Retired Moderator

    Yea, I agree. By creating an image with AnyDVD HD disabled, you're creating an image that's as close to the original as possible. Then when you mount it, make sure AnyDVD HD is enabled for your virtual drive and it will remove all protections from the mounted image. The reason this is good is because if a bug is found in AnyDVD HD that corrupts the stream or any other problem, you only need to update AnyDVD HD once a fix is released and then remount your image. No re-ripping necessary. Also, for those that want to burn, mount the image with the latest version of AnyDVD HD and do a disc copy to burn it to a blank disc. No need to re-rip it again and then burn it. Just burn from the mounted drive.
     
  6. Bigrick

    Bigrick Well-Known Member

    i should have done that from the begining. i made an .iso of all 50+ of my blu ray and hddvd movies. i think they all work fine but i havent watched all of them yet. but for now on i think ill do your method until i put it on a disc when these prices start to drop
     
  7. roog

    roog Well-Known Member

    Samuri, you're right about only having to make the ISO once. I stand corrected. :bowdown:
     
  8. gwolfman

    gwolfman Well-Known Member

    Same here. :*( Oh well. I'll do that from now on.
     
  9. 3r1c

    3r1c Well-Known Member

    Making iso with anydvd disabled is a BAD idea.
    You never know what might happen in the future of player software etc.., best to make a decrypted copy sooner.

    Sure it might have been a good temporary solution before BD+ was cracked, but there is no reason for it now.
     
  10. roog

    roog Well-Known Member

    It's better to have a non-decrypted ISO because you can apply any version of AnyDVD HD to it to produce a decrypted ISO. With a decrypted ISO you're stuck with the AnyDVD HD version you used to decrypt it.
     
  11. Jong

    Jong Well-Known Member

    It seems people are talking at cross purposes here.

    As a general rule I would say decrypt if you are completely removing all protection and leave encrypted if you are not. If all encryption is removed then you do not need any version of AnyDVD in future.

    However,at the moment I can understand , with new tweaks to the protection coming out with almost every disc, that people want to leave the disc as is so they are sure AnyDVD does not damage it during the ripping process. Unless it is a disc known to work without problems or you have time to check it thoroughly afterwards it seems the safest option right now.
     
  12. roog

    roog Well-Known Member

    I'm not saying that this will happen, but what do you do if you only have decrypted ISOs and a player software/firmware update renders them unplayable? Of course you can re-rip but why not avoid the hassle in the first place.
     
    Last edited: Apr 9, 2008
  13. Jong

    Jong Well-Known Member

    I get your point, but if it really is free of all DRM remnants that would mean also breaking playback of home videos, which is pretty unlikely.
     
  14. SamuriHL

    SamuriHL Retired Moderator

    This makes no sense to me at all. If AnyDVD can remove the protection from the original, then it can remove it from a protected ISO just as easily. IOW, I treat a protected ISO as I would the original. The only difference being that you can't get a Volume ID from the ISO which means you need the title key in order to decrypt it. Big deal. And you really don't think we're going to see any more bugs in AnyDVD from here on out as they tweak BD+ to try and break AnyDVD? Let's be serious...James and Peer are absolutely AMAZING at what they do, but, mistakes do happen and bugs do creep in once in a while. I don't personally want to re-rip every damn disc because something got corrupted while removing the protection. I trust them to fix any problems that come up, as they ALWAYS do. I just can't say that every release of AnyDVD is perfect every time. As much as we'd like it to be. :) So for me, the safest thing to do is to let AnyDVD remove the protection from my mounted ISO...again, treating it no different than I would an encrypted original.
     
  15. windsorr

    windsorr Well-Known Member

    I am on the page with SamuriHL on this one...using his method pretty much ensures that you wont have to re-rip everything...which would me a major drag....
     
  16. hlkc

    hlkc Well-Known Member

    Can't agree more!!! This is THE only method I use nowadays and everyone should highly consider if not already.
     
  17. gwolfman

    gwolfman Well-Known Member

    Can you elaborate on this more? What do you mean and how does it affect trying to play the mounted disc?
     
  18. SamuriHL

    SamuriHL Retired Moderator

    I can try. AACS encryption is not my strongest knowledge area by any means. In order to decrypt a Blu-ray or HD DVD disc, you ultimately need a title key. However, the title key is made up of different parts. I don't offhand remember all the different parts, but, essentially you need to have a valid host certificate in order to authenticate with the drive so that you can read the volume ID. This volume ID is one of the pieces that's used to get the title key. That volume ID is not transferred to the ISO(it's impossible to do so), so, AnyDVD HD has no way of retrieving the volume ID from a mounted ISO in order to retrieve a title key for an unknown title. This is why we say to scan the original disc first. At that point, if it's a disc that AnyDVD HD doesn't have a title key for, it will authenticate with the drive, read the volume ID and whatever else it needs, and acquire a title key from the server. From then on, AnyDVD HD will be able to decrypt that particular movie by just using the title key. Hence, when you mount your ISO, AnyDVD HD has the key to decrypt it. I hope this was a decent enough explanation.
     
  19. roog

    roog Well-Known Member

    AnyDVD HD release 6.4.1.1 corrected a problem with BD+ discs. If you made an ISO with AnyDVD HD enabled then you may need to re-rip.
     
  20. hlkc

    hlkc Well-Known Member

    That's why SamuriHL method is the way to go and no need to worry to re-rip again.